“I was born in Italy and grew up in Rome, Tel-Aviv and New York. I was a New Yorker in my teens, 9th and 10th grade (this was in ’74 to ’76, the Twin Towers were growing out of the ground).

I kept a delicious nostalgia of the city as experienced by a 15 years old : Baskin Robbins’ “Fudge Twirl”, guitar lessons at the “Y”, a pair of carton-stiff “Levi’s” from (a cool new store around the corner” the Gap” (yes!), ice skating in Central Park. We could see the reservoir from our living room window (12th floor), and the sunset firing up the windows of the west-side front line. Magic!
“Speaking the local language of places you visit changes one’s traveling experience, and gets you closer to people you meet.”

I came to Paris to study Graphic Design with the clear intention of going back to NY after graduation, and “live the NY pace to the full”, this time as an adult. And nearly 30 years later, I’m still in Paris.

I did go back to NY a few times, to visit friends, but I now feel “a stranger in the city” and the “NY pace” I longed for, does not seem as appealing to me anymore …

“I’m still in Paris.”

I used to rush to the cinema to see the new Woody Allen and get my yearly NY dose (but he’s been “traveling” in his last films) and any romantic NY Christmas comedy will do ! These movies make my nostalgia simmer!

“I did go back to NY a few times, to visit friends, but I now feel ‘a stranger in the city’, and the “NY pace” I longed for, does not seem as appealing to me anymore …”

No, the pace in Paris is NOT the same, nor is the attitude (I think…it might have changed.)

As for food, there is French food in NY and American food in Paris… No, I don’t think THAT’s the primary difference.

(The Paris vs New York blog you made me discover is BRILLIANT !)

I think that knowing foreign languages opens up one’s mind and life in general. I was lucky to have to learn 4 languages in my childhood. It comes so easily when you’re a kid. Personally, I don’t mind Americans not speaking French, as I can manage English. But I know from experience that speaking the local language of places you visit changes one’s traveling experience, and gets you closer to people you meet.

Daniela Bak is an Italian free-lance graphic designer based in Paris, France. After 12 years of television graphics, she moved to the printed media, designing and art-directing magazines, newspapers and books. She creates logos, brand manuals and posters. She also works as an illustrator and has illustrated four children’s books. Speaking four languages allows her to work worldwide. She just finished designing a logo for a Creative Media company in California, a brochure for an african food industry, and a logo for an Israeli Insurance Company. Right now she is designing brochures and posters announcing a future Parisian tramway line. Her work always takes into account sustainable aspects of graphic design (see more Bak Office).

 

 

I Loved New York: Daniela’s writing was so great and personal I kept in its stream of conscious essay format. It also echoes; to an extent; how I feel about New York.  These are the questions I Loved New York posed to Daniela: You live in France? How often to you get to New York? What are your favorite landmarks or icons? Do you have a routine when you land in the city; lunch here, cafe here, dinner here? Have you seen the Paris Vs New York blog; it’s really great. What are the primary differences between Paris and New York; is it the food? The attitude is much the same; as is the pace. Don’t you wish more Americans spoke French; when I visited with my sister years ago; I was embarrassed not to know the language even as my sister did.

Dozens of Ways to ♥ New York.Via The New York Times: “Now that JetBlue Airways is using Milton Glaser’s famous “I ♥ NY” logo in a new advertising campaign, The Times asked readers to imagine commingling Mr. Glaser’s logo with other New York brands or slogans.”

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